Archive for December, 2015

Happy Holidays 2015 from Hillsborough Bottletrees

Happy Holidays to all our friends and fans! We have exciting news from our headquarters — Santa brought us our very own brand new Jeremy Stollings original metal bottletree! This tree is more than 10 feet tall and holds almost 40 bottles — in other words, it’s huge! We love the twisty, curvy style and the abundant look.

Best wishes from us to you for a very shiny, sparkly Happy New Year in 2016!

sunlight bottletree jeremy stollings branches bottle tree ironwood crafts sparkly blue bottletree jeremy stollingsbranches bottletree ironwood crafts blue and green bottletree jeremy stollings

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NC Museum of History “Southern Impressions” Now Open

southern impressions

Southern Impressions at the NC Museum of History

The eagerly anticipated “Southern Impressions” exhibit at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh is now open to the public (free admission).

We got a chance to see the exhibit when it opened, and we were deeply moved and inspired to see the beautiful artwork, the evocative artifacts, and the glittering bottletree which greets visitors upon entering. The bottletree was commissioned by the Museum and built by Hillsborough artist Jeremy Stollings.

Most of all, we loved the multi-layered effect of all the items and artwork together, representing centuries of connections among people, culture, and landscape of the South. As southerners ourselves, we hold these things dear, and love the way the bottletree helps represent the many converging traditions in the South, stretching back through Africa, Europe, and Asia.

We highly recommend visiting this thoughtful and lovely exhibit. The Museum is located at 5 East Edenton Street in Raleigh, and is open Monday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays noon to 5 p.m.

bottle tree with blue bottles at the NC Museum of History

Bottletree artist Jeremy Stollings places one last bottle on his organically inspired tree, “Rusted Roots.”

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Bottletree to be featured in new exhibit opening Friday, Dec 11, at the NC Museum of History

"Rusted Roots" bottle tree by Jeremy Stollings

“Rusted Roots” bottle tree by Jeremy Stollings

In October we wrote about our field trip to the Ironwood Crafts workshop in Hillsborough, NC, where we dropped in on artist Jeremy Stollings working on his bottletree commissioned for the N.C. Museum of History’s upcoming exhibit, “Southern Impressions.”

Now, we are delighted to announce that the free exhibit will be opening this Friday, December 11.

The exhibit will feature paintings from the James-Farmer Collection which explore the diverse southern experience through people and landscape. The paintings will be complemented by southern artifacts including quilts, baskets, pottery, musical instruments, and yes – a bottletree!

From the Museum’s announcement:

“The variety of paintings by native-born and visiting artists captures their unique reflections of the South from 1820 through 1950,” says Michael Ausbon, Associate Curator of Decorative Arts. “The artists convey the beauty — and the harsh realities — of the region’s history.”

Artists with works featured in Southern Impressions range from Sarah Miriam Peale, of the noted Peale family of painters, to Eugene Healan Thomason, who is recognized as the “Ashcan Artist of Appalachia.” Ashcan artists portrayed gritty realism in the early-20th-century American experience.

Greeting exhibit visitors will be an eye-catching, organically inspired “bottle tree” made by Durham metal artist Jeremy Stollings. The southern tradition of placing bottles on tree limbs near a home’s entrance reaches back to central African traditions and to superstitious Europeans who believed that evil spirits roaming at night could be captured in empty glass bottles.

Congratulations to Jeremy for this great honor! We can’t wait to see Rusted Roots in its new home in Raleigh! For lots more photos of the design and sculpting process of the tree, you can visit the Ironwood Crafts Facebook page.

The N.C. Museum of History is located at 5 E. Edenton Street in downtown Raleigh. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. For information about the N.C. Museum of History, a Smithsonian-affiliated museum, call 919-807-7900 or access ncmuseumofhistory.org.

Painting by Eugene Healan Thomason. Loan from James-Farmer collection

Going Home: “Going Home” Eugene Healan Thomason (1895-1972) of South Carolina. Thomason is recognized as the “Ashcan Artist of Appalachia.” Ashcan artists portrayed gritty realism in the early-20th-century American experience. Painting from the collection of Dr. Everette James and Dr. Nancy Farmer of Chapel Hill. Photo credit: N.C. Museum of History

Painting by Knute Heldner. Loan from James-Farmer collection.

Swamp Scene: “Swamp Scene With Cabin” by Knute Heldner (1886?-1952) of Sweden. Heldner immigrated to the United States in 1902 and received national and international recognition for his southern landscapes and for his sympathetic, emotion-filled portrayals of rural southern life. Painting from the collection of Dr. Everette James and Dr. Nancy Farmer of Chapel Hill. Photo credit: N.C. Museum of History

 

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